Sacramento River Cruise

Have you ever been on one of those European River Cruises? Well this is nothing like that, but the river cruise here in Sacramento has a fun flavor of its own.

The boat was a bit lackluster to say the least, clearly worn on the inside and only beverage service and snacks (a bit overpriced if you ask me). It was seaworthy though and served its purpose

Looking back at the doc as our narrator began to describe the Sacramento river and its history

Like the Delta King, a restaurant, bar and hotel with beautiful views and elaborate architecture. It doesn’t move from the dock though

The I street bridge (really original name there) which carried traffic and trains over the river for over 100 years, but now will just be for trains as they build a new bridge just to the north for cars and bikes

This pretty riverfront high-rise is an office building for the state teacher’s retirement system, which is considering building a second one next to it to accommodate growth in teachers and associated pension activity

The remnants of a world war two era wooden boat

Cool water tower

Lots of people and watercraft were outside on this spring day

This is a water intake plant that provides water to the sacramento area, there are many along this river and the American river to supply the flat part of the region

I loved the design touches like these lights with boat sail motifs

This is the old water intake plant, things have grown since the 20’s

This bridge is over the American river around its confluence with the Sacramento river

It is apparently a good place to fish where the two rivers meet

The white marker indicates the confluence

Looking back to discovery park on the river, a county run money grab (there is a similar, but smaller park that is free a bit down river) and you can see the dark American and cloudy Sacramento

Those colors reflect their origin and courses, as the American starts reasonably nearby in the high sierra and doesn’t pick up much dirt on the way here, while the Sacramento river flows hundreds of miles through ag land that deposits lots of brown silt in it

Unfortunately due to the housing crisis and other issues, many people live along the river in makeshift camps. You can see one in this shot hiding

You can see the tent a little better here, unfortunately many of these areas were flooded the following winter and led to a lot of people having to move

Another very old shipwreck

As you head north on the river, there are many public and private harbors, like this one, Crawdad’s on the River

Here is the floating restaurant

Not the only one, the virgin sturgeon is relatively famous among boaters

Lots of riverside activity up here

But also home to humble, quiet residences along the river

The Ziggurat building with a cormorant, can you see it?

I think this angle will be easier to see it

Former Sutter’s Landing, a dock in Washington (now the city of West Sacramento)

the Hawaiian Chieftain was in town providing historical tours of the replica and sailing lessons to apprentices, next to Joe’s Crab Shack

This little control room sits atop the Tower Bridge , so it can lift when the occasional large ship comes through

It was painted gold after the city decided it needed an iconic structure, as the plain steel wasn’t as memorable

They even painted the underside gold!

Hence the name, Tower Bridge

This is the more modern Pioneer Bridge carrying US Highway 50 over the river, installed in the early 70’s

Unfortunately there were some derelict boats rotting on the side of the river

Looking back onto downtown sacramento

And that iconic bridge from a rare perspective for us non-boaters. The river may look high, but later that year it got within two feet of the base, making it about 14 feet higher than this picture

Next up, my fantastic October 2016 whirlwind trip to Seattle and around the Olympic peninsula over a series of posts.

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